Tuesday, June 28, 2022

Be well, stay safe, take care. Happy growing.

Get the local dirt in our northwest corner

Ruffles and rust: Chicks on a Hot Tin Roof combine styles

Mar 1st, 2014 | Category: Crafts

by Jessamyn Tuttle

Carrie de Kubber of Everson and Joey VanderPol of Burlington were friends for 15 years before they decided to quit their jobs and start a craft business together. “People say ‘Hey, you’re crafty!’ and ask us to make things,” said Joey.

Their business, Chicks on a Hot Tin Roof, focuses on handmade signs using salvaged windows, maps, cutting boards and other materials, as well as new and refinished furniture, plant pots and flower boxes, garden décor, light fixtures, and repurposed items. Their signs and windows often feature photographs with verses, song lyrics or other quotations. A particular favorite is the text of Paul Harvey’s “So God Made a Farmer” speech superimposed on a farm image.

Carrie de Kubber, of Everson, and Joey VanderPol, of Burlington, are Chicks on a Hot Tin Roof. COURTESY PHOTO

Carrie de Kubber, of Everson, and Joey VanderPol, of Burlington, are Chicks on a Hot Tin Roof. COURTESY PHOTO

During their first event together last year (at the Lynden Craft and Antique Show), they held a contest to name their booth, which had a piece of metal roofing as a wall. So when the name Hot Tin Roof was proposed (by Melanie Kors of Bound to ReStyle) it seemed like a perfect match.

The pair sell both ready-made and custom work, but they like craft shows for exposure, especially since their work often looks better in person than in photos. They are returning to the Lynden Craft & Antique Show and also attend the Burlington-Edison High School holiday craft bazaar. If they try to do too many shows, they overreach themselves, scrambling to finish custom orders while getting ready for the next show, they said.

Carrie and Joey almost never collaborate on individual pieces, although they often ask each other for an opinion on new work. When they receive an order they look at the materials and style that the customer wants and assign it to whichever of them is best suited to make it. “We work well together,” said Joey. They describe their combined style as “ruffles and rust,” with Carrie (who has her own side business, MAE west design) being more rustic in her style and Joey inclining towards lace.

They primarily use their Facebook page for showing new work and taking orders. Because so much of their work is made to order, they don’t have an online store, but they emphasize that placing an order is as simple as sending them a message. “People are surprised that you don’t have to know exactly what you want,” said Carrie. They’re happy to make your project entirely from scratch in any size. Their business motto is “What can we make for you?”

“We take a lot of pride in what we produce, and I think it shows,” said Carrie.

“If we don’t think it’s perfect we’ll make a new one,” added Joey.

This sign is made with a vintage map mounted on a piece of maple.

This sign is made with a vintage map mounted on a piece of maple.

For more information, follow their Facebook page or contact them at chicksonahottinroof@gmail.com.

Printed in the March 2014 issue of Grow Northwest

A popular request is a personalized farm sign, including the words from the “So God Made a Farmer” speech. COURTESY PHOTO

A popular request is a personalized farm sign, including the words from the “So God Made a Farmer” speech. COURTESY PHOTO

Tags:

One Comment to “Ruffles and rust: Chicks on a Hot Tin Roof combine styles”

  1. VICKI MYERS says:

    Hi, my daughter Kristin Wilmer suggested i contact your company for a project i am trying to do… I am wanting a sign with metal stake to put in the garden in front of a little crab apple tree, we are calling our “family tree” would like the sign to maybe have flowers on it… six of them with name or initial of each sibling …so when we pound it in to the ground at base of the tree it would look like the flowers are growing there..
    Linda, Cathy, Patti, Vicki, Judy, Chris
    maybe around 12″ long and 6″ high with a 15″ metal stake ??
    Is this something you could do and if so could you send me ideas and cost?
    You can call me if you have any questions. thanks Vicki 360-421-2621

Leave a Comment